Photoshop tricks: Create a quirky upside down portrait

    Photoshop tricks: Create a quirky upside down portrait

    Photoshop is a serious tool for pros and enthusiasts, but it’s also good for the odd giggle… In this Photoshop trick, we show you how you can create a quirky upside down portrait.

    By using Layers and Photoshop’s Transform tool, you can easily flip any face upside down. If you want to try this fun technique on your friends, keep the background clutter-free and use a light source off to one side like on our example portrait here.

    01 SELECT THE FACE

    Open your own close-up portrait and grab the Polygonal Lasso tool. Click to make a rough, straight-edged selection around the edges of the face. There’s no need to be too precise. Go to Select>Modify>Feather, enter 20px and hit OK.

    02 COPY THE FACE

    Hit Cmd/Ctrl+J to copy the face on to a new layer. Open the Layers Panel (Window>Layers) then double-click the Background layer. Hit OK in the New Layer box. This will convert the Background layer to make it editable like any other layer.

    03 ROTATE THE HEAD

    With the lower layer highlighted, go to Edit>Transform>Rotate 180. Highlight the top layer, then grab the Move tool and drag the face into position. If you need to rotate it, hit Cmd/Ctrl+T, drag outside the bounding box, then press Enter to apply.

    04 FLIP THE FACE

    On the original portrait the face was lit with a light off to the right of the camera, so there’s a shadow on the left. The upside down face doesn’t match up, but we can fix this by going to Edit>Transform>Flip Horizontal.

    05 MASK THE EDGES

    If you need to work on the edges of the face, click the Add Layer Mask icon in the Layers Panel, then grab the Brush tool and paint with a soft-edged black brush around the edges to hide parts of the face and blend the layers.

    06 CLONE TO TIDY UP

    Click the Create New Layer icon in the Layers Panel, grab the Clone Stamp tool and then set Sample: All Layers and Opacity 30% in the Options bar. Hold down Alt to sample a source, then use the Clone Stamp tool to tidy up any rough areas for a seamless finish.

    This entry was posted on Monday, April 15th, 2013 at 7:00 am and is filed under Tutorials. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a comment. Pinging is currently not allowed.

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    | Tutorials | 15/04/2013 07:00am
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